Doctor of Ministry Program

Are you engaged in ministry and looking for ways to equip yourself with the skills needed to continue reaching your community? Missio offers advanced studies that train men and women to become practical, advanced missional leaders in their churches and ministries. Regardless of whether you are in ministry professionally or as a lay leader, our courses will help you obtain a robust knowledge of theology and culture along with the tools to gain the wisdom to become an effective leader.

Whether you are looking to develop a theology of cities based on Scripture, reinvigorate an established church or organization, or learn to interpret Scripture in a way that leads to effective communication, our Doctor of Ministry program offers exciting and challenging courses.

At Missio, all of our courses are geared to incarnate and communicate the story of Jesus with humility and authenticity. We strive to foster an environment where our students will develop the commitment, skills, capacities, and transferable habits to be effective missional leaders.

Overview of the Doctor of Ministry

The Doctor of Ministry program is a professional program intended for men and women actively engaged in full-time Christian ministry. The equivalent of the Doctor of Ministry in other professions is, for example, Doctor of Education (EdD), Doctor of Jurisprudence (JD), and Doctor of Psychology (PsyD).

The twenty-five credit program takes a minimum of three years to complete. The program provides an advanced understanding and integration of ministry in relation to missional theology, ecclesiology, and careful study of issues related to culture and context.

Students develop advanced skills and competencies for missional leadership and complete a doctoral-level project that contributes new knowledge and understanding of the practice of ministry.

Earning an advanced professional degree such as the DMin means that the students have prepared themselves to accept new challenges and opportunities for the Kingdom and as the Spirit leads.

Why Missio’s Doctor of Ministry Degree?

The Missio DMin program offers the following advantages:

  • Week-long residential courses are done in a learning community to maximize holistic personal development
  • Course calendar fits busy ministry schedules
  • Program can be completed in as few as 36 months.
  • Applied research project is done in your ministry context
  • An experienced project adviser is assigned to each student
  • Highly flexible program that can be tailored to an individual student’s ministry, interests, and context including missional leadership, exposition, church planting, non-profit leadership, pastoral counseling, etc.
  • Learnings in the classroom and through the personalized project can be directly and immediately applied in the student’s ministry context
  • Students are other ministry professionals
  • Faculty are experienced ministry practitioners
  • Writing for the dissertation is primarily completed through course assignments during the required courses

Curriculum

The core courses provide students with the skills and competencies needed to turn around, reinvigorate, plant, and propel established churches and organizations into more effective ministries that are strategically positioned for missional engagement in the 21st century.


Core Courses – 15 Credits

Advanced Ministry Research and Writing
Community Analysis for a Changing World
Applied Missional Theology
Missional Leadership Development
Missional Cultural Studies


Notes regarding the program:

Course Workload and Length of the DMin Program

Residency weeks are scheduled so that students can prepare pre-course work before coming to campus. Typically 1500 pages of assigned reading are required and twenty-five pages of written assignments precede the residency week. The post-residency is typically fifty pages of written assignments and is due within six weeks after the residency week.

Some students may be required to take propaedeutic courses. Contact the program director for details.


Total Required Credits – 25

The two Personalized Project Studies (PPS) will be done as independent studies, with one day of residency after the course for the semester (Mondays – Thursdays for the course residency, and Fridays for the PPS residency). The purpose behind these is to allow the students to investigate areas that are unique to their particular projects. The necessary research methods needed for each PPS are explained and demonstrated in the DMin Handbook.

During the DM 941 Advanced Ministry Research and Writing course which develops the students’ project proposals, students will work with the DMin Director and/or the Assistant DMin Director to determine what topic they would be studying in their PPS. This study would be due one month after the other coursework is due, leaving time at the end of the term to do the pre-work for the next course. PPS 1 will be supervised by the DMin Director and/or the Assistant DMin Director. PPS 2 will primarily be supervised by the students’ advisors. This process would keep the students on a steady road toward completing their dissertations on time. Below is a description of these two studies.


Project Studies – 6 Credits

Personalized Project Study 1
Personalized Project Study 2


Notes regarding the program:

Course Workload and Length of the DMin Program

Residency weeks are scheduled so that students can prepare pre-course work before coming to campus. Typically 1500 pages of assigned reading are required and twenty-five pages of written assignments precede the residency week. The post-residency is typically fifty pages of written assignments and is due within six weeks after the residency week.

Some students may be required to take propaedeutic courses. Contact the program director for details.


Total Required Credits – 24

The applied research project integrates the knowledge and skills learned in the DMin coursework with the analysis of a specific program, problem, or case in the student’s ministry. It provides the student with the opportunity to make a professional contribution to missional praxis in the student’s chosen context.

The term “applied research project” refers to the entire DMin project as described in the modules below. The term “dissertation” refers to the actual written document.


Project Modules – 4 Credits

Project Update
Project Completion


Notes regarding the program:

Course Workload and Length of the DMin Program

Residency weeks are scheduled so that students can prepare pre-course work before coming to campus. Typically 1500 pages of assigned reading are required and twenty-five pages of written assignments precede the residency week. The post-residency is typically fifty pages of written assignments and is due within six weeks after the residency week.

Some students may be required to take propaedeutic courses. Contact the program director for details.


Total Required Credits – 24

Am I Eligible to Apply for the DMin Program?

Admission to the DMin degree requires a completed MDiv degree or its equivalent from an accredited institution and three years of ministry experience subsequent to the first theological degree. Students who are interested in the DMin program and who have a graduate degree but do not hold the MDiv degree may qualify for the DMin program by completing a pre-doctoral course of study. MDiv equivalency is defined as broad-based work in theology, biblical studies, and the arts of ministry and that includes a master’s degree and significant ministerial leadership. Applicants must complete all elements of the application forms and process.

Ready to start your journey?

Whether you are looking for more information regarding a program, scheduling a visit, starting the application process, or just wanting to talk to someone about your dreams, our admissions department is always available to assist you and answer any question that you might have.

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